Decorating Guides

<p>New Icons: Kartell’s Bourgie Table Lamp</p>

It’s so much fun when designers mash up forms with contemporary materials. In the instance of this Bourgie Lamp, designer Ferruccio Laviani crafted traditional Baroque shapes from a modern material, polycarbonate. The result is a modern lamp that provides a wink and a nod into a age where the more ornate something has been, the better.

YLiving.com

Kartell Bourgie Table Lamp – $362

Laviani’s layout adds creativity into the mix. Its own lampshade is a matching polycarbonate, and the height can be corrected by adding spacers between the foundation and the shade.

Incorporated

This bedroom combines fantastic-plastic and Baroque style, and our small Bourgie is just the guy to tie the two together.

Side note: Wondering about these fab throw pillows? They are all by Hable Construction.

Sindahl

The Bourgie was an ideal choice for Swedish blogger Signed by Tina, who mixes traditional and contemporary bits in unexpected ways, as the lamp does.

Watch the rest of this Exceptional home

Sindahl

Tina also used Bourgie as a reading light, now in the chrome version. This is a woman who knows how to play with texture, and the metallic lamp emphasizes the reflective qualities of this background.

Simply Grove

Blogger Kirsten of Simply Grove is also a lover of matching the Bourgie with metallic background. Here it functions as a lamp.

Nicole Lanteri Design

The Bourgie is all up to the job as a desk lamp, giving light and style without being cumbersome.

Peter A. Sellar – Architectural Photographer

This Bourgie forges a solid relationship with the crystal chandelier, tying the dwelling area and the foyer together.

Peg Berens Interior Design LLC

Don’t want things to be this transparent? In addition to crystal, the Bourgie also comes in black, white, chrome, gold and white. Black definitely shows off his fine figure the most clearly.

More:
Modern Icons: The Logico Lamp
Modern Icons: The Caboche Chandelier
Hot and Loaded Desk Lamps

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Home

<p>Let’s Hear It for Townhomes and Duplexes</p>

While the majority of the thousands of photographs on Houzz pertain to single-family homes, a number of multi-family jobs can also be found. They offer alternatives in contexts but also in towns not only to homes.

These new methods of both retrofitting and infilling the suburbs are coming to the fore in the face of energy and climate crises. Multi-family home of even two units offers the benefits of more efficient heating and heating arising from shared walls and generally smaller house sizes, a decrease in water use for yards, and also the potential to generate enough density in an area to make walking a feasible alternative to driving.

Eggleston Farkas Architects

This development in Seattle, Wash. made by Eggleston Farkas offers an alternative to typical townhomes in the area, putting duplex units on the road with three broader units in the back of each building. The modern design in wood and concrete features generous glazing to provide the units plenty of natural light.

Seattle is also home to Pb Elemental, who have designed lots of multi-family jobs — a few “twins” with exactly the same or comparable plans mirrored on each side of a walkway or shared wall.

The second-floor volumes here articulate the openings differently to provide each residence its own individuality, while still making it clear that they are part of a single project.

These townhomes, also made by Pb Elemental, appears to be situated next to smaller homes. Turned 90 degrees to the road, using a driveway on the other side, the job fits a somewhat narrow bit and comes closer in scale to its neighbors. The modern design in timber is surely pleasing.

A previous Pb Elemental project comprises three live/work units with ground floor retail area. Pictured are two units in the trunk, removed in the road from the front building and also an area for parking. Notice the paving.

David Vandervort Architects

Here is a development using four townhomes, also in Seattle, which is more conventional in appearance, pitched roofs and all. Collective living need not mean stylistic antagonism; it can take cues in the local fashion whilst offering a lower ecological footprint and other 21st-century benefits.

Another Seattle development incorporates balconies and courtyards oriented to gardens and a water feature. The latter is a key draw to the job whilst creating a strong awareness of entrance via bridges on the road home.

Maltby Design

This duplex job in Vancouver, British Columbia comprises generous balconies facing the road and a rooftop deck. There is something striking and appealing about the yellow wood which makes up this particular elevation.

Contemporary house architects

As mentioned earlier, a common way of designing multiple units would be to mirror duplicate or similar plans. Here that is evident in the entrance to a couple units of a three-unit job. But seen overall …

Contemporary house architects

The entire job isn’t as symmetrical as the entrance in the previous photo would have us believe. The next unit gives it an asymmetrical form that almost makes it look like a massive house — if it weren’t for the three garages under the balconies.

Studio Momentum Architects, PC

Here is a duplex in Austin, Texas that also appears to be a large residence in the road. 1 unit faces the front, and the second one is tucked in the back, reached via the side driveway.

Zack|de Vito Architecture + Construction

This duplex in San Francisco, Calif. jobs one in front of another to provide each its own character supporting precisely the same garages. The backyard condition …

Zack|de Vito Architecture + Construction

… shows how the terraced backyard, shared by both units, gives privacy to each if desired. Multi-family home does require a particular social negotiation in regards to green space, but it is generally well worth it.

GLS Architecture/Landscape Architecture

The grade of the spaces generated through multi-family housing is surely important. This large job in San Francisco about a block in the love-it-or-hate-it Federal Building from Morphosis) features units facing the streets into the west and east whilst half of the units face the bamboo courtyard pictured here. A view from down on the walkway …

GLS Architecture/Landscape Architecture

Shows this space to be softer than the road fronts. I really could see the courtyard units becoming more desirable — and costly — than the units on the streets.

ON Design Architects

This development of townhomes is situated on a triangular site in Santa Barbara. The residences are oriented with this thoughtfully designed alleyway that looks like it could be a location for block parties and other social gatherings with all the neighbors. Whatever the circumstance, it is an amenity that arises from the density that is a portion of the evolution.

This previous instance, by Rhodes Architecture + Light, illustrates that even single-family homes can be created in improvements to bring their benefits closer to those of multi-family buildings.

Anderson Gardens includes four homes (three new, one renovated) that surround a massive garden. Previously a farmhouse, the property is currently home to a few more homes than another suburban context might support.

Next:
More inspirational architecture

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Remodeling

<p>Your Floor: How to Shop for Tile</p>

There’s a lot more to buying ceramic tile than finding a color and pattern that can function in an area. Each tile manufactured and sold has an intended use, and that intended use is made pretty clear on the label of a box of tile. But, it in code. Understanding this code can go a long way to helping you purchase the ceramic tile that is ideal for your project, and it might even save you money.

TAU

Ratings. There are four or five evaluations categories listed on each box of ceramic tile. Five when it is a glazed tile and four if you’re buying unglazed tile. Any time you’re preparing to purchase tile, make sure to read the label. Start looking for any particular tile grade, PEI rating, water absorption, coefficient of friction, frost tone and safety. Inside this Ideabook, I’m going to go through and discuss each of these categories and the reason why they’re significant.

avairefloors.com

Grade. The first class is a tile grade. A tile will have a grade from one to three. Grade one is the highest quality, grade two is similar to grade one but it will almost always be less expensive. Grades one and two are acceptable for flooring. Grade three tile aren’t thick enough to walk, and they are only meant to be used on walls. Although you are able to use floor tile as wall tile you cannot use wall tile as flooring tile. Make certain that any tile you’re considering for your flooring is at the very least a grade two.

daltileproducts.com

Wear rating. The second category is something known as a PEI rating. PEI stands for the Porcelain and Enamel Institute’s wear rating. PEI rates a glazed tile’s ability to withstand abrasion and its suitability as a floor tile. Only polished tiles get a a PEI rating, if you’re buying unglazed tile you won’t find this class to the the label.

daltileproducts.com

Daltile Continental Slate™ Asian Black – $5

Ceramic tiles ranked PEI I and II are appropriate to be used as wall tile only. They are normally decorative and cannot withstand foot traffic. Tiles rated PEI III offer moderate resistance to wear and they’re appropriate for most residential uses. Tiles that carry a PEI IV are highly resistant to wear and suitable for many residential and some light commercial uses. Tile rated PEI V would be the most resistant and therefore are appropriate to be used in heavy commercial places. If you can save money with a PEI III or PEI IV tile, do it. Anything ranked greater than that is overkill for residential uses.

TAU

Tau Galileo Collection – $10

Water-absorption rate. Another significant category to consider when you’re taking a look at ceramic tile is its own water absorption rate or W.A.. A tile W.A. rating will let you know whether a tile you’re considering is the ideal tile to use at a wet area or outdoors.

There are four categories from the W.A. rating plus they are expressed as a title and percent of water consumed by a tile.

TAU

Tau Ancona Collection – $7

Nonvitreous Vinyl absorbs over 7% of its own weight in water and can be inappropriate to be used outdoors or in a wet place such as a tub or spa. Semiviteous Vinyl absorbs between 3 percent and 7% of its own weight in water and it also is only suitable to be used in dry, indoor places. Vitreous tile absorbs only 0.5% to 3 percent of its own weight in water and it is a rating you want to see whether you’re using a tile outdoors or in an area where there’s a great deal of moisture present. The final group is high heeled also it consumes less than 0.5% of its own weight in water when subjected.

azulev.com

Azulev Slate – $9

What’s referred to as a porcelain tile isn’t really made from porcelain, but it is in that final category, impervious. A tile must consume less than 0.5% so as to be called porcelain. A lot of instances, that label porcelain carries a price premium and in the event that you’re able to save some cash by buying a vitreous tile (0.5% to 3 percent water absorption) you will be being a wise consumer. Tile categorized as vitreous has to be known as ceramic. Do not look away in the event that you find a floor tile that is not labeled as a porcelain tile. A vitreous ceramic flooring tile will do the job you want it to do in your home.

daltileproducts.com

Daltile Fabrique™ Soleil Linen – $7

Slip resistance. Another significant rating is a given tile coefficient of friction, abbreviated as C.O.F.. The COF refers to a tile’s organic resistant to slip and it is measured by the force needed to slide an object across a surface divided by the object’s weight. Reduced C.O.F. numbers indicate less friction and the flooring will provide less traction. Higher C.O.F. numbers indicate that a flooring will be less slippery.

Crossville, Inc..

Crossville Tuscan Clay Series – $9

A C.O.F. more than .50 is suggested for standard residential uses. A C.O.F. more than .60 is needed for business uses and to meet Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines. If you’re seeking to tile a bathroom floor, listen to that C.O.F rating. The greater the number, the less likely you’ll be to slip when you’re getting from the shower.

Crossville, Inc..

Crossville Empire Series – $15

The last two categories are Frost and Tone. Frost is a simple either/or rating and it tells you if can withstand freeze and thaw cycles outdoors. If you’re using a tile inside, this rating doesn’t matter.

And finally, the final group is Tone. Tone only applies when there is deliberate variation from tile to tile to mimic the look of stone. If you’re looking for a tile with consistent color, toned tile isn’t for you. That class however, is definitely something to search for if you’re considering only tile samples.

More: Two More Tile Materials to Love
How to Locate the Ideal Stone Tile
How to Shop for Solid-Plank Wood Floors

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Siding

What to Know Before Installing Insulation

Regardless of the type of Aurora siding material that you choose for your home, the insulation has to be installed accurately by a professional in order for you to get the full value and benefit of what you’ve invested in it. In fact, it usually takes a full team of skilled workers to properly install insulation, and while your insulation contractor will be there to supervise the installation, they’ll be communicating and working closely with your builder as well.

While installing high-quality insulation is important, the way in which it is installed can make or break its performance. For example, if you install fibrous insulation material over a surface that has cracks, gaps and air voids, the expected performance of that insulation immediately drops by almost 50%. So, make sure you hire an experienced Aurora vinyl siding contractor to do the job, which you can find by asking your architect or builder for references.

Just make sure that they’ll be able to deliver the appropriate thermal protection (R-Value) required by your home, and they are familiar with the different types of insulation that are available.

Things to Consider During the Installation Process

At this point, your goal should be to make sure that your installer enables you to get the most out of your insulation’s thermal management properties.   

Basically, you should look out for the following:

Visit the construction site during the vinyl siding Aurora, CO installation to make sure that it’s not being forcefully smashed and compressed into the wall cavity, but rather installed properly and efficiently.

Inspect the junction boxes to make sure that there’s enough insulation around the back, around the pipes as well as the wiring. The best method usually involves splitting the insulation so that one side of it is wrapped around the wire and the other on the pipes to make sure that they’re fully sheathed. Failure to properly wrap insulation around the pipe will make it vulnerable to freezing.

Check to see if access points like bock grills and vents have not been blocked with insulation, as is often the case with hastily installed insulation. Blocking the ventilation system in your house with insulation can seriously compromise and eventually damage its functionality. Make sure to talk to your contractor about avoiding these areas before the installation starts.

Where Should Insulation Be Installed?

As a homeowner, you should also know where the insulation needs to go, and what types of insulation go in which area.

Typically, it’s recommended to install insulation in the following five areas:

Your attic, using fiberglass and/or cellulose

Interior and exterior walls, using rigid boards with a vapor barrier. For interior walls specifically, foam, fiberglass batts and cellulose work extremely well.

The floors, using traditional fiberglass batts and rigid foam boards.

Crawl spaces can be insulated with fiberglass, cellulose or foam.

The basement should be insulated with fiberglass and rigid boards for the best results.

As you can see, there’s quite a large variety of vinyl siding Aurora, CO materials to choose from, all of which work for different areas in your house. Just make sure to consult with your builder regarding which materials are better suited for the environment that you’re in because climate can also play a role in the type and amount of insulation required.